Monday, May 01, 2006

Monday Question of the Week . . . Baptism


Yesterday I worshiped in a congregation that I did not belong to and had never worshiped in before. The service included the baptism of two infants and I was drawn back to a question I have grappled with for years. Is it ok, appropriate, or faithful to answer the questions asked of the congregation during a baptism at a congregation to which you do not belong and a community in which you do not live, work, or spend any time?

6 comments:

Cat. said...

Much verbosity from me here.

Great artwork with this post, by the way.

Anonymous said...

I say yes. Even if you aren't a member of that congregation you are making a symbolic affirmation to care for babies/children/parents wherever you are...

jim said...

Yes. A particular congregation is not an island unto itself but a part of the larger church universal. Besides, reaffirming that commitment elsewhere ought to remind you of fulfilling that particular commitment wherever you worship locally.

Pastor Lance said...

I say... no.

Scripture talks seriously about our making promises. How can we promise to do things for this child when we will never see him or her ever again. Will God hold you accountable for your failure to raise up child if that whole congregation also fails to keep their promise?

I think we should be carefull when we promise to do something.

FullCourtPresby.blogspot.com

Virtual Circuit Rider said...

It seems to me that the key is to recognize in all of us that child. When we baptize we claim for the child the grace of God and are reminded that we too have received that grace. The congregation speaks for the church universal (even the church that doesn't recognize their connection) and when we promise to provide care for them we are really promising to care for all that we encounter in our churches, both new and veteran christians.

Virtual Circuit Rider said...

It seems to me that the key is to recognize in all of us that child. When we baptize we claim for the child the grace of God and are reminded that we too have received that grace. The congregation speaks for the church universal (even the church that doesn't recognize their connection) and when we promise to provide care for them we are really promising to care for all that we encounter in our churches, both new and veteran christians.